Density Gradient Swimmers

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wapcaplet
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Density Gradient Swimmers

Post by wapcaplet » Sat Dec 24, 2016 7:01 pm

Another day, another cell lab creation. In the category of in-game visualization tools, I made these swimmers mostly to learn more about the effects of three related paramters: Gravity, Density, and Density Gradient. They ended up making a cool pattern of colors:

density-gradient-swimmers.substrate
red-blue-density.png
red-blue-density.png (17.08 KiB) Viewed 2548 times
Blue is low density, and red high density. Due to the orientation of their buoycytes, they swim in opposite directions. Blues spawn more reds, and reds spawn more blues to keep the cycle going, and they all die when they reach the edge of the substrate so they don't pile up.

Observations:
  • Gravity affects how quickly they sink or float. With low gravity, red and blue are more mixed together overall, since the buoycytes are not reaching their equilibrium point as fast. With high gravity, there's a clearer separation between red and blue.
  • Density affects the overall mid-point of the two bands, since it raises or lowers the horizontal line where cells have neutral buoyancy (where un-split cells tend to settle). Lower density moves them all toward the bottom (since cells are relatively heavier), high density moves them all toward the top (since cells are relatively lighter).
  • Density Gradient affects how tightly the reds and blues band together. When it's low, the bands are more dispersed; when high, the bands are tight and more of a solid line. I think this is because a "higher" gradient value (meaning absolute value, since its range is all negative) means there's a wider spread of density across the plate from top to bottom. So if it's D in the center, it's D+G at the bottom, and D-G at the top (again, G being absolute value of what's shown on the slider). When G is 0, the whole plate is just density D.
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Botcell
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Re: Density Gradient Swimmers

Post by Botcell » Sun Dec 25, 2016 4:56 am

I actually did want to explore density gradient but I had other stuff to get to.
I used Gravity and Density to kill off organisms mainly.
"Oh hey do you see that?"
"Yeah it's getting bigger"
"Wait I think tha-"
*Slams into substrate wall*
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bwisialo
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Re: Density Gradient Swimmers

Post by bwisialo » Tue Dec 27, 2016 6:25 am

Nice visualization. :)

If Density gradient is 0, then Density is a constant -- uniform across the substrate. If Density gradient is increased, then Density increases or decreases as move away from the resting point -- at a distance from the resting point, Density will be higher or lower than Density at the resting point. A cell at default density will move very fast at a distance and will gradually slow down as it approaches the resting point.

Wish I could formulate that more clearly. ;)
amor fati
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wapcaplet
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Re: Density Gradient Swimmers

Post by wapcaplet » Wed Jan 11, 2017 5:18 am

Further experiments in density gradients led me to another nice visualization:

density-spectrum.substrate
density-spectrum.png
Ten modes of photocytes spit out ten modes of buoycytes with a range of densities. I stuck with the snap values, and used the range -1.98 to +1.98. At the top and bottom are +/- 1.98 density; then +/- 1.31, 0.86, 0.57, and 0.25. Curiously, +1.98 density is insufficient to go all the way to the bottom, but -1.98 is enough to go all the way to the top (you can see the gap below the red cells at the bottom).

Overall substrate density is 0.0, so regular cells have a neutral buoyancy right in the middle. Gravity is at maximum, to get the fastest possible equilibrium. Density gradient is also at maximum, to get the widest spread. Reducing density gradient causes a wider spread in the middle, with different colors piling up at the top and bottom. With density gradient at 0, all the buoycytes go all the way to the top or bottom, though smaller values take longer to get there. This also makes the entire plate "neutrally buoyant" for regular cells.
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Alast
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Re: Density Gradient Swimmers

Post by Alast » Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:25 am

Very cool visualization :)
Perfection hasnt reached me yet, but its trying hard!
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wapcaplet
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Re: Density Gradient Swimmers

Post by wapcaplet » Fri Jan 13, 2017 2:16 am

In the same theme, I created these smart swimmers with high and low density buoycytes, to make them become specialized to the bottom or top of a substrate with a moderately strong density gradient and high gravity. I found that a single buoycyte doesn't really give enough buoyancy to significantly lift or pull down the entire swimmer, but with two buoycytes it's fairly effective.

double-density-swimmers.substrate
double-density-swimmers.png
double-density-swimmers.png (16.33 KiB) Viewed 2433 times
All swimmers come from a single genome; blue makes yellow and vice-versa. Blue swimmers are lightweight (-1.98), and yellow ones are heavy (+1.98). The green ones are the younger stage for both blue and yellow, and are only slightly buoyant or heavy (+/- 0.25), allowing them to thrive (and even reproduce) in the middle area until they mature into their double-buoycyte adult form.

Next I'm thinking of making heavy/light swimmers that are male/female, with just enough overlap for them to mate in the middle. Dunno how well it would work, but could be fun!
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