Evolutionarily viable cell types

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wapcaplet
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Evolutionarily viable cell types

Postby wapcaplet » Sun Dec 24, 2017 4:31 am

I have been doing a lot of evolution experiments lately (using the beta version) to learn more about what cell types are most likely to be favored by evolution, and why.

These experiments are in pure evolution--nothing whatsoever designed and placed on the substrate. Simply random cells according to the "cell types" check boxes, plus radiation to make them change. Adjust other settings as you like--viscosity, gravity, light, anything, but evolution does all the work, and you just wait.

The substrate settings make a lot of difference in what cell types may thrive. With nutrients around, phagocytes can multiply. With light, photocytes will multiply. Both can survive because they get energy (and mass) from the environment.

If you add in devorocytes now, they can survive on the other cells. If you had started with just devorocytes, they would not have survived. But with prey (photos or phagos), a predator (devoros) can subsist.

Buoycytes express themselves in a substrate with gravity. I like using a density gradient, which lets normal cells settle in a horizontal band in the middle. Then you get both light buoycytes and heavy ones. Without gravity and some density offset or gradient, buoycytes don't do an organism any good, and don't stick around long-term.

Flagellocytes will be advantageous in any substrate where movement increases likelihood of energy absorption, maybe phagocytes eating nutrients, maybe photocytes following a rotating light. They are useless in a friction environment, though, and will never evolve there.

What about keratinocytes? I have seen them evolve many times in defense of devorocytes. If you have a photocyte organism evolving in war with a devorocyte population, and you check the "keratinocytes" check box, you may need to crank the radiation pretty high, but it shouldn't take very long for those keratinos to prove themselves valuable to some organisms. Photocytes grow a keratin she'll and push back the wall of teeth.

Finally, virocytes. It should be no surprise that they will thrive almost anywhere. I have seen virus parasites evolve with swimmers in three different ways, and a photocyte virus that fought a large algae for hundreds of substrate hours until the virus completely killed it, cleaning the plate.

I have only done a couple tries with gluocytes. Swimmers with phagoctyes that would have gluocytes and stick together in weird many-celled blobs.

What about stereocytes, secrocytes, neurocytes, myocytes? I've tried a few, but none of them seemed to get anywhere. If you have this great phagocyte critter bouncing around happily, eating nutrients, under what conditions would it do that critter any good to spend energy making stereocytes? Stemocytes? Gametes or ciliocytes? It's hard to think of any.

Has anyone seen these other non-obvious cell types appear, and stay, in any randomly mutated organism? What would it take to pressure their evolution?

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ElNico5
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Re: Evolutionarily viable cell types

Postby ElNico5 » Sun Dec 24, 2017 8:50 am

The problem with neuron cells is that random cells and non point mutations radiation dont change substance dependence
Writing from a small house in Agmalarkiia

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wapcaplet
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Re: Evolutionarily viable cell types

Postby wapcaplet » Thu Dec 28, 2017 11:34 pm

Even if all sensory and neural cells had evolvable settings, what are the conditions you would need for a simple organism to develop a neurocyte, stereocyte, or senseocyte? Or to develop other cells influenced by them? There may be a way to condition the environment to make those things likely to develop, but I have not thought of a way how.

I figure each cell type can be pressured to exist based on what the environment is like. Photocytes are pressured by having more light. Buoycytes are pressured by having gravity and a density offset or gradient. Keratinocytes are pressured by a devorocyte predator in the environment. All these pressures are because having the cell type helps the organism survive, and those without those cell types are at a disadvantage. Or you could say, the cell's function is worth the energy it takes to keep that extra cell alive.

For photocytes (with light around) or devorocytes (with edible cells around), it's obvious their function justifies the energy of keeping the cell, since they gain energy. The same is true for phagocytes.

But other cell types demand energy--what purpose do they serve in return? Buoycytes must justify their energy intake by being useful to the other cells in the organism--such as helping phagocytes move up and down to collect more food.

Again it's all about the environment. What conditions in the environment and the other organisms in it can we use to pressure development of the more exotic cells?

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