Move it!

Post your own challenge to your fellow researchers!
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wapcaplet
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Re: Move it!

Post by wapcaplet » Fri Feb 10, 2017 8:32 pm

Alast wrote:Getting there! I made it to 870 without evolution!
Mind blown... :shock:
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wapcaplet
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Re: Move it!

Post by wapcaplet » Fri Feb 10, 2017 8:54 pm

Wow, I had not tried evolution at all for this challenge before, but a little bit goes a long way. I took my 2-cell winner that could barely maintain 60-70 on the harder "Move It! 2" substrate, and evolved it on the easier "Move It! (1)" substrate for just a few minutes. Now it can hold 300-350 cells indefinitely on the harder substrate, peaking at near 400. Unbelievable!
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Alast
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Re: Move it!

Post by Alast » Fri Feb 10, 2017 9:03 pm

Update: 920 :mrgreen:
Perfection hasnt reached me yet, but its trying hard!
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Alast
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Re: Move it!

Post by Alast » Fri Feb 10, 2017 9:17 pm

Aaand I maxed out the substrate!!!

Yet again one of those challenges I wouldn't have thought were possible to max put and yet it was. Makes me remember the time Scarce Conditions was the Benchmark :-)
Perfection hasnt reached me yet, but its trying hard!
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Alast
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Re: Move it!

Post by Alast » Fri Feb 10, 2017 10:22 pm

Coming to think about it, this solution maxing out the substrate basically proves almost everything wrong I have learned about designing efficient organisms in the past! This challenge is so different it has its own rules. I'm amazed right now!

I mean, some other challenges I've created look beautiful or are unique in an obvious way.

This one is like it's speaking its own language! A totally new paradigm that is hidden within. Just astonishing!
Perfection hasnt reached me yet, but its trying hard!
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bwisialo
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Re: Move it!

Post by bwisialo » Fri Feb 10, 2017 11:02 pm

In some contexts, certain kinds of inefficiency work out to have big advantages. Is that what's happening here ?
amor fati
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bwisialo
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Re: Move it!

Post by bwisialo » Fri Feb 10, 2017 11:10 pm

A worm would definitely be less efficient. Food chunks are so low that an inefficient worm may not run into the problem of exhausting all chunks at one time, the way more efficient food finders would.
amor fati
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wapcaplet
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Re: Move it!

Post by wapcaplet » Sat Feb 11, 2017 1:12 am

Something I've noticed with this challenge and smart-farters in general is that it may take several passes to fully consume the larger nutrients, especially since the phagocytes only exist for a split second. This may be allowing them to share food better among several organisms that pass through the same area, where a standard smart swimmer might tend to eat them completely, leaving an empty patch.

Another unusual factor in play here is the excellent propulsion of cell splitting in low viscosity, giving a speed and distribution rarely seen in flagello-powered swimmers. Here again, the high-speed cell is less likely to exhaust nutrient chunks as it passes over them, leaving some behind for the next guy to eat.
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bwisialo
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Re: Move it!

Post by bwisialo » Sat Feb 11, 2017 3:38 am

At low viscosity and / or high swim force, a swimmer's Phagocyte will also pass over chunks without consuming the whole thing. I haven't looked closely at what happens here with split force movement. A one cell organism is going to move further and faster than a 3-cell or a worm.
amor fati
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wapcaplet
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Re: Move it!

Post by wapcaplet » Sat Feb 11, 2017 4:45 am

True... After writing that, I went back and checked again, and the nutrients are often consumed in full after all, so maybe I just imagined it. I am at a loss to explain how apparently efficient these farting critters can be. You would think that repeatedly dumping 10% of your cell mass would kill any organism in a very short time. My 2-celled ones will sometimes do a 90/10 split more than 50 times before getting a chunk of food, so you'd think they would only have 0.9^50 = half of 1% of their original mass left, yet somehow they survive. The math doesn't seem to work. But here we are, and Alast is getting 1000 cells out of less than 100 available food. :D It's kind of a mystery.
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