Move it!

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wapcaplet
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Re: Move it!

Post by wapcaplet » Sat Feb 11, 2017 5:27 am

Part of this might be explained by the phagocyte re-absorbing the tiny nutrient left by the failed split. With just a single phagocyte splitting 90/10 on a substrate with no nutrients, it split anywhere from 28 to 45 times before dying, so there's a bit of randomness involved that I guess could be explained by nutrient reabsorption.

Some quick tests with a lipocyte are surprising. We know that the initial cell has exactly 3.0ng mass. Using an M1 lipocyte with 90/10 split, I fiddled with the split mass slider and got the following:

3.01: No split
3.0: 1 split
2.76: 2 splits
2.54: 3
2.35: 4
2.18: 5
2.02: 6
1.88: 7
1.76: 8
1.64: 9

The lipo is retaining about 92 to 93% of its mass, rather than just 90% as I assumed. But even stranger, I tested the 10% piece separately (also a lipo) and found that it will split as high as 0.85ng! So it appears to be getting about 28% of the original lipo's mass, instead of just 10%. In other words, that single 3.0ng lipo is becoming a 2.76ng lipo plus an 0.85ng lipo, a total of 3.61ng.

I don't know if this is a bug, exploit, or what, but I like it. ;)
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Alast
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Re: Move it!

Post by Alast » Sat Feb 11, 2017 6:41 am

Yes, my organism is a worm creature. But it's not just that! Against the usual "design rules" the Stereocyte is in front of the Phagocyte with the Phagocyte being the birthing (egg producing) cell. (So the Stereocyte in two versions is the result of the Stemocyte, just for clarification.)

Also, and this struck me as really interesting, the genome got higher cell counts when I increased the Nutrient Priority of the Stereocytes versus the Phagocyte. This one I don't have an explanation for yet!
Perfection hasnt reached me yet, but its trying hard!
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Alast
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Re: Move it!

Post by Alast » Sat Feb 11, 2017 10:11 am

Wow :shock: Even on default viscosity my worm manages to get into the 500s with the potential to peak at 600!
Perfection hasnt reached me yet, but its trying hard!
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bwisialo
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Re: Move it!

Post by bwisialo » Sat Feb 11, 2017 10:37 am

Neither of those seem particularly strange to me. Re: Lower priority Phagocyte -- Whereas an egg-producing Stereocyte gradually gains mass via mas redistribution, an egg-producing Phagocyte will swell with mass when it gets food chunks. A higher priority Phagocyte that gets a food chunk will spit out an egg pretty readily, without much of the mass getting distributed to the cells in front of the Phagocyte. This will tend to leave those cells relatively smaller, making them even less able to get mass from the rear Phagocyte, making them smaller still. Those cells need some forward mass flow.
amor fati
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Alast
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Re: Move it!

Post by Alast » Sat Feb 11, 2017 1:08 pm

Well, if you put it that way. I was expecting higher Phagocyte priority to create more offspring.
Perfection hasnt reached me yet, but its trying hard!
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wapcaplet
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Re: Move it!

Post by wapcaplet » Sat Feb 11, 2017 3:21 pm

Another curious experiment in cell farts:

Substrate: Max salinity, 0 nutrients
M1: Lipocyte -> M2+M3 (adhesin)
M2: Lipocyte, no split
M3: Phagocyte, 90/10 split at 0.5h

When M2 and M3 have equal nutrient priority (1:1), the phagocyte splits 380 to 390 times before dying.

When M3 phagocyte has minimum nutrient priority (1:10 relative to the M2 lipocyte), it splits a whopping 445 times!

And when M3 phagocyte has maximum nutrient priority (10:1 relative to the M2 lipocyte), it only splits 112 times before dying. The phagocyte is much larger, and loses more mass with each split.

This is in stark contrast to a single M1 phagocyte that only does 90/10 splits--that barely lasts 30 to 40 splits. So it seems a farting cell attached to another cell will survive a lot longer than one by itself. Of course things will be different if the other cell is energy-consuming (like a stereocyte), but this bears out my observations of longevity with the 2-celled smart farter.

I haven't checked whether high-mass cell farts give more propulsion than low-mass ones, but a pretty good rule is to keep the farting cells as small (low priority) as possible to minimize mass loss.
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Alast
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Re: Move it!

Post by Alast » Sat Feb 11, 2017 3:37 pm

This conclusion is in contrast to my observation where the farting Stereocytes having a higher priority that the birthing Phagocyte results in much higher cell counts.
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wapcaplet
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Re: Move it!

Post by wapcaplet » Sat Feb 11, 2017 3:49 pm

Hmm... Can you PM me your genome? Now I'm curious.

Regarding phagocytes for birthing, in general I've found their priority to have relatively little impact on egg production, since they can get nutrients directly. Even at minimum priority, eating a nutrient can make them pop out an egg before they have time to distribute the nutrients to other cells.
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Alast
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Re: Move it!

Post by Alast » Sat Feb 11, 2017 3:56 pm

That is true. They eat faster than adhesin connections transfer the energy. I will PM you.
Perfection hasnt reached me yet, but its trying hard!
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Alast
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Re: Move it!

Post by Alast » Sat Feb 11, 2017 4:36 pm

Made my 2 cell farter max out, too :-)
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